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Archive for the ‘Adrienne Rich’ Category

We recently received a note from Tamara Harchanko asking for help finding a passage from Adrienne Rich. I did some searching. I found several references to this passage:

An honorable human relationship–that is, one in which two people have the right to use the word “love”–is a process, delicate, violent, often terrifying for both persons involved, a process of refining the truths they can tell each other.

It is important to do this because it breaks down human self-delusion and isolation.

It is important to do this because in so doing we do justice to our own complexity.

It is important to do this because we can count on so few people to go that hard way with us.

It was written by Adrienne Rich and is attributed to several sources that include:

  • “Women and Honor: Some Notes on Lying,” spoken by Adrienne Rich at the Hartwick Women Writer’s Workshop, 1975;
  • Published as a pamphlet by Motheroot Press, Pittsburgh,1977
  • Published in Heresies: A Feminist Magazine of Art and Politics, vol. 1, no. 1, 1979
  • Published in French by the Québecois feminist press, Les Editions du Remue-Ménage, 1979
  • Published in On Lies, Secrets, and Silence: Selected Prose 1966-1978, W.W. Norton & Company, New York, 1979

The last reference appeared most often in my searches, but I could not find the entire essay in full online. Only one source referred this passage as a poem, which it said is entitled On Love. You can see that here.

I was not able to find any reference to the ensuing line “the question is not what to tell or how much to tell.” But, then, I didn’t read the passage from the original essay. So it may very well be addional text.

 I hope that helps.

P.S. I did have Adrienne’s name misspelled in my categories list. I’ve corrected that.

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Our second meeting of poet enthusiasts took place on Sunday, April 15. In the gloom of the rainy afternoon, we sat in a cozy living room sipping tea and tasting some evil and some not-so-evil treats. These are the poems we read, listened to and discussed.

Pablo Neruda (1904-1973) – Chilean-born Nobel Laureate for Literature – bio 

Ode to My Socks read from the book America’s Favorite Poems by Robert Pinsky

Tom Wayman (1945 – ) – bio

Did I Miss Anything? – offered to us tongue in cheek by one who missed our first meeting! Did you miss anything??? No, not with this web site around!

William Wordsworth (1770 – 1850) – bio

I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud

Daffodils

Parodies of Wordsworth’s poem

Gordon J.L. Ramel – web site

Daffodils No More – a comment on the fewer numbers of daffodils in England these days.  NOTE: I recently revisited these links and somehow the poem is now called Daffodils Revisited

David Martin (DCDave) web site

I Wandered with a Wrought-up Mind – be sure to click on the link for federal poles. Without it, I’m not sure I would have gotten the meaning.

Joy Burki-Watson

I Pondered ‘Neath My Faceless Shroud – a tribute to the courageous ladies of Afghanistan

Cumbria Tourism

Wordsworth Rap – A hip-hop video version of  I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud…just delightful!

Adrienne Rich (1929 – ) – bio

Storm Warnings

Turning – this isn’t the entire poem, but it is referenced in this NY Times analysis

William Henry Davies (1871-1940) – bio

Leisure

Thomas Hardy (1840-1928) – bio

The Darkling Thrush

Saliba Sarsar background info

When Peace Becomes The Holy Land

Robert Penn Warren (1905-1989) – bio

Caribou  -this isn’t the entire poem, but it is discussed here

If Snakes Were Blue

Bearded Oaks

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